LIVES OF THE BRETHREN
This Appendix contains brief biographies of all the members of the Province who have died since the Fourteenth Provincial Chapter in 1994. The following list is in alphabetical order. Biographies are given in chronological order according to the dates of death.
Brown, Duane AnthonyNovember 4, 1997
Budrovich, Stephen (Vatroslav)September 25, 1994
Cassidy, Donald (Conrad)September 14, 1994
Dempsey, James (Michael)March 19, 1996
Donlan, Thomas (Cajetan)February 26, 1999
Flynn, Thomas (Valerian)February 4, 1997
Freeman, Justin (Hilary)November 3, 1998
Kalinowski, Donald (Anthony)March 22, 1997
Kelly, James (Brendan)January 13, 1998
Kowalkowski, Bruno (Hyacinth)August 10, 1998
LaMotte, Samuel (Victor)May 19, 1999
McDonald, John (James)December 20, 1996
McGreal, Dominick (Michael)November 21, 1998
Morahan, Gerald (Bertrand)June 4, 1998
Nintemann, Bernard (George)November 30, 1996
Pieper, Robert (Ferrer)August 19, 1998
Pikell, Edward (Donald)January 31, 1998
Prazan, Robert (Ceslaus)July 5, 1998
Rutkauskas, Benedict (Albert)March 29, 1995
Staszak, John (David)August 31, 1998
Weber, Richard (Vincent)January 7, 1996


Conrad Donald Cassidy, O.P.

Brother Conrad Cassidy was born in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, July 31, 1909, the only child of Andrew and Elizabeth O'Connell Cassidy. The family moved to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where Conrad completed his grade school and high school education. In 1937 he entered the Dominican Order and received the habit at the Dominican House of Studies, River Forest, Illinois. Early in his religious life he was assigned to Fenwick High School, Oak Park, Illinois, where he served as sacristan. He also wrote poetry in his early years. Four years later he was assigned to St. Pius Priory, Chicago, Illinois, where he worked in the print shop of the Shrine of St. Jude Thaddeus. After seventeen years in this position he returned to Fenwick High School, where he oversaw the security of both the school and the priory.

When the Dominican community of St. Dominic Priory at Fenwick moved to St. Thomas Aquinas Priory (the House of Studies) in River Forest, Brother Conrad joined them there. During his latter years he was afflicted with severe diabetes and moved into the assisted living facility at St. Thomas Aquinas Priory. After being admitted to Oak Park Hospital with chest pats he was stricken with a massive heart attack and died on September 14, 1994. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at St Thomas Aquinas Priory on September 17, 1994, and he was buried in the Dominican plot at All Saints Cemetery, Des Plaines, Illinois.


Stephen Vatroslav Budrovich, O.P.

Father Stephen Vatroslav Budrovich was born in Velo Grablje, on the island of Hvar, Croatia [formerly Yugoslavia], October 13, 1923, the son of Nikola Budrovich and Mandica Zaninovich. His primary education was A the village school of Velo Grablje and for his secondary schooling he attended the Dominican High School at Bol on the Island of Brac. In 1943 he entered the Order at the Dominican Priory in Dubrovnik and received the religious name of Vatroslav (Ignatius). He was professed there (October 1, 1944, and then pursued philosophical studies in Dubrovnik and Zagreb. Father Budrovich studied theology in Zagreb, Olomouc in Czechoslovakia, Nijmegen in Holland, the Saulchoir in France, and Oxford University in England.

Because of the political situation he could not return to his homeland to be ordained, and so the Master of the Order permitted him to go to Oakland, California, where a number of his relatives lived, and there he was ordained a priest on September 6, 1949. He was then transferred to the Dominican House of Studies, River Forest, Illinois, where he completed his theological studies, earning the degrees of Lector in Sacred Theology and Master of Arts. During this time he also served as an assistant pastor at St. Vincent Ferrer Parish, River Forest, Illinois.

In 1952 upon completion of his postgraduate studies, Father Budrovich was assigned as an assistant to Holy Trinity Croatian Parish, Chicago, and in 1959 became a citizen of the United States. In June, 1966, he succeeded Father Innocent Bojanic as pastor of Holy Trinity Parish, a ministry in which he continued to serve until his death. In addition to his parish duties he has served as State Chaplain of the Catholic War Veterans of the State of Illinois, Chaplain of the St. Procopius Post and Auxiliary of the Catholic War Veterans, Chaplain of the 32nd Division of the Red Arrow Club of Chicago, Chaplain of the Holy Name Society, Chaplain for the Knights of Columbus, Illinois Council, and was a member of the Fourth Degree Joseph A. Powers Assembly of the Knights of Columbus.

Two days after celebrating his 45th anniversary of ordination Father Budrovich entered the hospital for surgery to remove a growth in his stomach which proved to be malignant. While in the hospital he suffered several strokes, his condition gradually worsened, he sank into a coma and died at Mercy Hospital on September 25, 1994. He was waked at Holy Trinity Church by the parishioners whom he had served for over forty-one years and the Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated on September 28, 1994. He was buried in the Dominican plot at All Saints Cemetery, Des Plaines, Illinois.


Benedict Albert Rutkauskas, O.P.

Benedict Rutkauskas was born on March 21, 1911, in the village of JonuŻiai, Lithuania, eldest of the eight children of Vincentas and Petronelé (Grigalyté) Rutkauskas. His primary education took place in Lioliai, Lithuania, from 1921 to 1924, after which he attended the "Gymnasium" (junior college) in Raseiniai from 1924 to 1931.

On September 22, 1933, Benedict received the Dominican habit and religious name of Albert and began his novitiate in the Order at Amiens, France. He made his first profession there on September 23, 1934; his solemn profession at Le Saulchoir, Belgium, in 1937.

Following first profession, Brother Albert moved to the Albertus Magnus Academy in Walberberg, Germany, for philosophical studies, 1934 to 1 93T Fie was then sent to Le Saulchoir, Belgium to study theology, 1937 to 1939, and was ordained on July 16, 1939, by the Most Reverend Jean B. Amoudru, O.P.

Father Rutkauskas then returned to Lithuania where his first assignment was as assistant pastor and procurator in Raseiniai. From 1941 to 1943, he continued his studies, first at the Theological Faculty in Kaunas and then at the Archdiocesan Seminary in Vilnius. For a year he served as an assistant pastor and religion teacher in Vilnius, Lithuania. In 1944 his own Province was completely disbanded after the Soviet takeover of Lithuania and he was forced to flee his country. From 1944 to 1947 he served as chaplain to the Lithuanian refugees in Germany, and from 1947 to 1950 as high school teacher and chaplain of students, also in Germany. During this time he was assigned to the jurisdiction of the Master General of the Dominican Order.

In 1950 Father Rutkauskas was sent to the Dominican House of Studies in Washington, D.C., to study English. Two years later he moved to Boyce, Louisiana, where he served as assistant pastor at St Margaret Parish and its surrounding missions until 1967. He then served an additional nine years as associate pastor at Holy Family Mission in Cloutierville, Louisiana.

During this time as preparations were being made for the 1973 Provincial Chapter, a question arose about the formal status of Father Rutkauskas in the Province. It had been assumed that he was a son of the Province of St. Joseph, but no documentation could be found. Hence, when the Master of the Order sent documentation declaring him a son of the Province of St. Albert the Great, Father Rutkauskas wrote to Father Clement Collins, then Provincial of St. Albert's Province:

  "There was a great joy for me to receive the document of Master General and your letter clarifying my status in the Province of St. Albert.
  "Thanks very much for your very kind attention to my petition and for all your efforts you have done in this my case. I'm also very thankful for all major and local superiors who treated me always like their own member."

in 1976 because of an increasingly limited number of personnel, negotiations began with the Diocese of Alexandria to reorganize the rural parishes in northern Louisiana and return them to the jurisdiction of the Diocese. At the age of sixty-five Father Rutkauskas indicated his wish to work once again with Lithuanian people, and so in the fall of 1976 he accepted the invitation of Father John Stankevicius, pastor of St. Anthony Parish, Cicero, Illinois, to become an associate pastor there, a ministry in which he served for thirteen years.

In 1989 he celebrated his fiftieth anniversary of ordination to the priesthood, a special Mass and reception being held on September 10. Although on limited service, he continued to serve as much as his health allowed, but was finally forced to retire from active ministry in 1991. He then moved to St. Thomas Aquinas Priory where he spent his last years in the company of his brothers. His health continued to decline and on March 29, 1995, he died while at Holy Cross Hospital. On April 1, 1995, the Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois, and he was buried in the Dominican plot in All Saints Cemetery, Des Plaines, Illinois.


Richard Kress Weber, O.P.

Father Richard Weber was born in Ypsilanti, Michigan, February 19, 1920 the son of Theodore S. Weber and Laura M. Kress. His primary education was at St Thomas School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, and at St. John School and Roosevelt School in Ypsilanti, Michigan. He attended high school at St. Columban High School Seminary, Silver Creek, New York, and for a time entertained the possibility of joining the St. Columban Foreign Missionary Society. In March, 1945, he was inducted into the U.S. Army and served until December, 1946, at which time he was honorably discharged. From 1947 until 1956 he attended the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, obtaining a bachelor's degree in 1951 and a master's degree in history in 1952. He immediately began working on a doctorate in history.

In August, 1956, he entered the Dominican Order at St. Peter Martyr Priory, Winona, Minnesota, and made his first profession there on

September 16, 1957. For three years he pursued philosophical studies at the Dominican House of Studies, River Forest, Illinois, and made his solemn profession there on September 15, 1960. He was then sent to Aquinas Institute of Theology, Dubuque, Iowa, for theological studies where he obtained the Lectorate in Sacred Theology in 1964. It was there that Bishop George Biskup, Ordinary of Des Moines, Iowa, ordained him to the priesthood on April 15, 1963. Immediately following the completion of his theological studies Father Weber returned to the University of Michigan to finish his dissertation on Vincent of Beauvais, O.P., and obtain his doctoral degree in history.

In the fall of 1965 he began his teaching ministry in the Province at Aquinas Institute of Theology in Dubuque, Iowa. With the exception of the 1966-67 school year when he taught at the Dominican House of Studies in River Forest, Illinois, he continued to teach church history at Dubuque until the school was relocated in the summer of 1981. During this time he served the Dominican community as Prior (1968-72) and was a visiting professor at the University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa (1970-71). For twenty-six years he served on the editorial staff of Spirituality Today (formerly Cross and Crown) and for the last thirteen of these years he was associate editor and book review editor for the publication. For nine years he was the gracious host and administrator of the "White House" (or "Grey House") at the Dominican Camp in Menominee, Michigan. He served as provincial representative to the Dominican Laity from 1979 until 1983, during which time he edited their publication Challenge. The brothers remember him for his homiletic ability, his subtle wit and his playfulness.

With the move of Aquinas Institute from Dubuque, Iowa, to St Louis, Missouri, in July, 1981, Father Weber took up a new ministry, that of Diocesan Preacher for the Diocese of Marquette, Michigan, although he continued to be a visiting professor of history at Aquinas Institute in its new location. His new ministry required him to be available for preaching, days of recollection, and continuing education programs for the Diocese. During this time he also served as an associate pastor, first at Resurrection Church, Menominee, Michigan, and then at Sacred Heart Church, Munising, Michigan. His interest in the process for the beatification of Bishop Frederick Baraga, the first bishop of Marquette, led to his appointment for a time as Vice Postulator of the Cause. It was during this time that he suffered a heart attack, the harbinger of the disease which would result in his death.

In the fall of 1991 the Provincial asked Father Weber to assume a new ministry, that of chaplain to the Dominican Nuns at the Monastery of the Blessed Sacrament, Farmington Hills, Michigan. In June, 1992, the progress of his heart disease required him to move to St. Pius V Priory, Chicago, IL, however, after successful by-pass surgery he was able to return to the Monastery in July, 1993. He ministered there until October, 1995, when the effects of his heart disease made it impossible for him to continue. Desiring to remain in Michigan, the state which he loved, Father Weber was transferred to Angela Hospice in Livonia, Michigan, where he died on January 7, 1996. A funeral liturgy was celebrated at the Monastery in Farmington Hills, Michigan, on January 9, 1996, in the presence of his family and the Nuns whom he dearly loved. His body was then taken to St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois, where a second funeral liturgy was celebrated on January 10, 1996. He was buried in the Dominican plot in All Saints Cemetery, Des Plaines, Illinois.


Bishop Michael James Dempsey, O.P.

James Edward Dempsey was born in Providence, Rhode Island, February 22, 1912, the son of Joseph M. Dempsey and Julia Mary McSherry. He attended St. Mary's Grammar School, LaSalle Academy and Providence College in Providence, Rhode Island. In August, 1935, he entered the Dominican novitiate at St. Rose of Lima Priory, Springfield, Kentucky, receiving the religious name of Michael, and made his first profession there on August 16, 1936. From 1936 to 1939 he pursued philosophical studies at the Dominican House of Studies, River Forest, Illinois, and made his solemn profession on August 16, 1939. He elected to join the new Province of St. Albert the Great and so continued his theological studies at the Dominican House of Studies in River Forest, where he was ordained by Bishop Bernard J. Sheil on June 11, 1942.

Having completed his basic studies, Father Dempsey was assigned to Fenwick High School, Oak Pak, Illinois, where he taught English and religion from 1943 to 1951 During this time he also attended DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois, and obtained a master's degree in English literature. In 1951 Father Dempsey was asked to undertake foreign mission work in Nigeria, Africa, and was among the first three friars sent by the Province of St. Albert the Great to this new mission territory. From 1951 to 1965 he served as pastor and local superior of

St. Dominic's Parish Yaba, Lagos State. In 1965 he was appointed Vicar Provincial of the Dominican friars in Nigeria and moved to Our Lady of Fatima Church, Gusau, Sokoto State.

On July 13, 1967, Father Dempsey was appointed the second Bishop of Sokoto, Nigeria, and on August 15, 1967, was ordained bishop at St. Pius V Church, Chicago, Illinois, by Cardinal John P. Cody, Archbishop of Chicago, assisted by Archbishop John Aggey of Lagos, Nigeria, and Bishop Aloysius Wycislo, Auxiliary bishop of Chicago. He was formally installed as ordinary of the diocese on October 1, 1967. Because of failing health as well as his belief that the diocese had need of an indigenous bishop, he submitted his resignation to Pope John Paul 11 on May 8, 1984. His resignation was formally accepted on December 31, 1985.

Bishop Dempsey returned to the United States in the fall of 1985 and, exercising his privilege of choosing a house of the Order in which to reside, took up residence at St. Dominic Priory, Denver, Colorado, where he spent the last years of his life. There he was active in assisting at St. Dominic Parish, especially in ministry to the sick and aged. Declining health necessitated his move to Mullen Home in Denver, a care facility sponsored by the Little Sisters of the Poor. There he died on the morning of March 19, 1996. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated by Archbishop J. Francis Stafford of Denver at St. Dominic's church on March 25, 1996, and Bishop Dempsey was buried in the Dominican plot at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Denver.


George Bernard Nintemann, O.P.

Bernard Francis Nintemann, one of five children of Herman J. and Angeline J. Nintemann of La Crescent, Minnesota, was born on April 11, 1931 . He and his twin brother Archie were the youngest of the children. His early education was in the public schools in District #32 of Winona County, Minnesota. He attended both Aquinas High School, La Crosse, Wisconsin, and Croisier Preparatory Seminary, Onamia, Minnesota, for his secondary education. His interest in priesthood and the Dominican Order led him to enroll in Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary, St. Mary's College, Winona, Minnesota, to prepare for entrance into the novitiate.

On August 30, 1952, he was given the habit of the Order and the religious name of George at St Pear Martyr Priory, Winona, Minnesota, where he made his first profession on September 7, 1953. He was then sent to the Dominican House of Studies, River Forest, Illinois, for philosophical studies (1953-1956), after which he was transferred to St. Rose of Lima Priory, Dubuque, Iowa, for his theological studies (1956-1960). While at Dubuque he made his final profession on September 7, 1956, and was ordained a priest by Archbishop Leo Binz at St. Rose of Lima Priory on May 23, 1959.

In August 1960, Father Nintemann received his first assignment as associate pastor at St Pius V Parish, Chicago, Illinois. Three years later he was assigned to full-time preaching on the Dominican Northern Mission Band, centered in Minneapolis, Minnesota; preaching ministry was to be the love of his life. In 1967 he was invited to joint the international "Movement for a Better World," which found him directing retreats in Europe, Central America, and Australia as well as in many parts of the United States. He was chosen as one of four who joined Father Riccardo Lombardi, S.J., founder of the "Movement for a Better World," in staffing the first English-speaking "Institute of Post-Conciliar Spirituality" held at Centro Pio XII, Rocca di Papa, Italy.

After a year on the parish team of St. Vincent Ferrer Parish, River Forest, Illinois (1970-1971), he returned to full-time preaching, residing first at St. Dominic Priory, Oak Park, Illinois, and then at St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois. In 1974 he was appointed prior of Holy Rosary Priory, Minneapolis, Minnesota, and this house became the center of his preaching ministry until 1986 when he moved to Sinsinawa, Wisconsin, and joined the chaplaincy team at the Dominican Sisters Motherhouse there. Because of the team ministry he was able to continue his preaching ministry, giving retreats and parish missions in the area. In addition to his preaching ministry Father Nintemann was known for his promotion of the cause of a fellow Dominican, Father Paschal Francis Kelly, O.P., and he served the Province as assistant promoter of causes for several years. In 1992 Father Nintemann returned to his home diocese of Winona and while residing at Owatona, Minnesota, assisted in parishes and continued his preaching ministry. In 1993 he moved to Rochester, Minnesota, where he was appointed parochial vicar of St. John's Parish and of St. Bridget's Parish, Simpson, Minnesota, On February 16, 1994, the bishop of Winona appointed him pastor of St. Bridget's Parish, Simpson, where he remained until his death.

In the early fall of 1994 Faber Nintemann was diagnosed with cancer of We colon, After surgery he began a treatment of chemotherapy and there appeared to be a complete remission. However in the spring of 1996 the cancer appeared in the liver and was pronounced terminal. George chose to stay at St. Bridget's Parish with the people he had served and where he continued to manage for a time with the aid of hospice care and that of the people of the parish. He systematically began to prepare for death, disposing of personal belongings and making his good-bye's to friends. In August, 1996, his classmate Father Jack O'Malley, O.P., came to stay with him during his last days. On the morning of November 30, 1996 he died peacefully at St Bridget's Rectory, Simpson, Minnesota. He was waked at St. Bridget's Church the evening of December 3, 1996. The next day the Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at St. John's Church, Rochester, Minnesota, and burial was at St. Bridget Cemetery, Simpson, Minnesota.


John James McDonald, O.P.

John William McDonald, the second of five children of William McDonald and Margaret Cecilia New, was born in Zanesville, Ohio, on April 29, 1910. His early education was in his home parish where he attended St. Thomas Grammar School and St. Thomas High School. Upon graduation from high school he attended Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island, for two years before entering the Dominican novitiate at St. Rose Priory, Springfield, Kentucky, in 1929, where he was given the religious name, James.

On August 16, 1930, he made his profession of vows and was sent to the Dominican House of Studies River Forest, Illinois, to pursue philosophy. His first year of theological studies was spent at St. Joseph Priory, Somerset, Ohio, where he made his final profession on August 16, 1933. In 1934 he was sent to the Dominican House of Studies, Washington, D.C., to continue his theological studies and was ordained a priest at St. Dominic Church by Archbishop Amleto Cicognani, the Apostolic Delegate, on June 10, 1936. He was immediately sent on for further theological studies at the Angelicum (University of St. Thomas Aquinas) in Rome, where he earned the S.T. D. degree in June, 1938.

After completing his graduate studies his first assignment was to the faculty of the Dominican House of Studies, River Forest, Illinois, where he taught both philosophy and moral theology. During this time he also taught philosophy and theology at Rosary College, River Forest, Illinois, and for a time served as chaplain at the College (1941-43). He was active in giving lectures for the Thomist Association in Madison, Milwaukee, Kenosha and Appleton, Wisconsin, as well as in the Chicago area. Summers often found him teaching at other Catholic colleges - Dominican College, Racine, Wisconsin; St. Mary's College and St Teresa's College, Winona, Minnesota. For nine years he served the Province as assistant Novice Master.

With the establishment by the Province of a House of Studies for Theology in Dubuque, Iowa, in 1951, Father McDonald joined the faculty there and continued to teach moral theology, During this time he served the community as subprior of St. Rose of Lima Priory 0 951 57) and then as Master of Student Priests (1957-61). On November 29, 1960, the Dominican Order honored Father McDonald for his twenty-two years of teaching by conferring upon him the degree of Master of Sacred Theology. While assigned to Dubuque he was also a lecturer in theology for the Dominican Sisters, Sinsinawa, Wisconsin, and for the Presentation Sisters, Dubuque, Iowa. In 1964 he was asked to apply his theological training to a new ministry as editor of Cross and Crown, a journal of spirituality sponsored by the Province of St. Albert the Great. For the next thirteen years he carried on this work in Chicago, Illinois, first at Blackfriars House, then at St. Albert the Great Provincial House, and finally at St. Pius V Priory. For a time he continued to lecture in medical ethics at Oak Park Hospital School of Nursing, Oak Park, Illinois. In 1977 he handed over the editorship of the journal to another Dominican, but continued to serve as business manager of Cross and Crown for another seven years.

In his latter years Father McDonald suffered from Alzheimer's disease which required his move to the Province's assisted-living facility at St. Dominic-St. Thomas Priory, River Forest, Illinois. Because of the progression of the disease in 1991 Father McDonald moved to St. Patrick's Residence, Naperville, Illinois, where he was cared for by the Carmelite Sisters. On the afternoon of December 20, 1996, he died peacefully at St. Patrick's Residence. The funeral liturgy was celebrated at St Pius V Church, Chicago, Illinois, on December 23, 1996, with subsequent burial in the Dominican Plot at All Saints Cemetery, Des Plaines, Illinois.


Thomas Valerian Flynn, O.P.

Thomas Francis Flynn, the second of five children of Owen Eugene Flynn and Mary Agnes Kearns, was born in Camden, New Jersey, on June 17, 1912. His early education was in his home parish where he attended St. Mary's Grammar School and St. Mary's High School. Following high school he went to work for a time as a dock-worker and also spent a year in the Civilian Conservation Corps. In 1935 he continued his education at Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island, graduating with a bachelor's degree in sociology and languages in 1939.

On August 15, 1939, he entered the novitiate of the Province of St. Joseph at St. Rose Priory, Springfield, Kentucky, and received the religious name Valerian. He made his profession there on August 16, 1940, and was sent to the Dominican House of Studies at River Forest, Illinois for philosophical studies. On October 12, 1940, he took advantage of the terms of the establishment of the Province on St. Albert the Great and transfiliated to the new province. Following his final profession on August 16, 1943, he began his theological studies at the House of Studies in River Forest, obtaining the Lector in Sacred Theology degree in 1946. Bishop William O'Brien, Auxiliary of Chicago, ordained him a priest there on June 18, 1946.

Father Flynn's first assignment in 1947 was as an instructor in philosophy at the College of St. Thomas, St. Paul, Minnesota. This was the beginning of a teaching ministry which was to be the focus of his Dominican life for many years, first at the College of St. Thomas (1947-49), then in the following years at De Paul University, Chicago, Illinois (1949-54), Xavier College, Chicago, Illinois (1954-55), Rosary College, River Forest, Illinois (1955-57), the Dominican Sisters' Novitiate, Rosaryville, Louisiana (1957-60), Loras College, Dubuque, Iowa (1160-64), Aquinas Newman Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico (1964-68), and the University of Dallas, Irving, Texas (1968-70). While teaching he continued his own studies and obtained a Ph.D. degree in philosophy from the Pontifical Faculty of Philosophy, River Forest, Illinois. During this time he also lectured for the Thomist Association and spent many summers teaching at colleges and motherhouses throughout the Midwest and giving retreats.

Following a year's sabbatical for scripture studies at the Catholic University of America, Father Flynn took up campus ministry at the University of Houston, serving there until 1974 when he moved to Galveston, Texas, and became a chaplain at St. Mary's Hospital. In 1976 he moved to Denver, Colorado, where he developed a program of scripture courses for adults which he presented in parishes throughout the Archdiocese of Denver. During this time he also carried on part-time hospital ministry in the Denver area.

Over the years he served as director of Dominican Laity chapters in Chicago, River Forest, Illinois, and Albuquerque, New Mexico, and in latter years as conventual lector at St. Dominic Priory, Denver, Colorado. He was a member of the committee which investigated the possible relocation of the novitiate of the Province and whose report resulted in its move to Denver. He was a voracious reader whose active mind never tired of learning new things. In the spring of 1996 he suffered a broken hip which began a gradual decline in health. Circulatory problems resulting from diabetes caused him to be hospitalized for surgery in late January, 1997. He died unexpectedly at St. Anthony Central Hospital on February 4, 1997. The funeral liturgy was celebrated at St. Dominic Church, Denver, Colorado, February 10, 1997, with burial in the Dominican plot at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Denver, Colorado.


Anthony Donald Kalinowski, O.P.

Donald Stanley Kalinowski was born in Chicago on May 21, 1935, b6ng the only child of Stanley John Kalinowski and Agnes Mae Walkowski. His education before entering the Order took place in Chicago, Illinois, first in the Chicago public grammar schools and St. Hyacinth Grammar School, then at Lane Technical High School, and finally at Wright Junior College.

He entered the novitiate for cooperator brothers on December 25, 1957, at St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois, and was glen the religious name of Anthony. There he made his profession of vows on February 16, 1959, and received his first formal assignment to St. Pius V Priory, Chicago, Illinois, where he worked on priory maintenance and served as sacristan for the parish. In 1966 he was transferred to St. Rose of Lima Priory, Dubuque, IA, where he served for a year as Assistant Director of Cooperator Brother Postulants and Novices before returning to St. Pius V Priory where he again served as sacristan for the parish and began his involvement in religious education programs which were to be the focus of his ministry for the rest of his life. Returning to college in 1970, first at Mundelein College and then Loyola University, both in Chicago, he obtained his B.A. degree in religious studies and continued on for a M.R.E. degree in religious education.

While pursuing his graduate studies he began to work for the Office for Religious Education of the Archdiocese of (Chicago and continued as a member of its staff until 1981 During this time he served in a number of capacities for the Office for Religious Education - as supervisor of the Child Division, as a consultant for adult education, as co-administrator of the RENEW program, and as a member of the Catechumenate Advisory Board. For a brief period of time he served as coordinator of religious education for St. Pius V Parish (1976-79) at the same time as he worked for the Archdiocese.

In 1986 he was sent to St Dominic Parish, Denver, Colorado, to become director of religious education for the parish, a ministry he continued until 1992. At the same time he served as a consultant for religious education for the Archdiocese of Denver. Taking advantage of a sabbatical year, he spent a semester at the Siena Spirituality Center, Water Mill, New York, and another at Aquinas Institute of Theology, St. Louis, Missouri. Returning to Denver after his sabbatical Brother Anthony took up a new ministry at Notre Dame Parish, where he served as director of religious education.

During the years Brother Anthony served the Province in many capacities -as a member of the Personnel Board (1971-74), as a member of the Commission on Continuing Education (1977-81), as a member of the Board of the Shrine of St. Jude Thaddeus (1986-88), and as a member of the Provincial Council (1985-90). He served his Dominican brothers in local communities as business manager, was the first cooperator brother in the history of the Province to serve as subprior of a community (St. Dominic Priory, Denver), and served a term as conventual lector for the Dominican community in Denver. He was active in the National Assembly of Religious Brothers and served as a member of its Executive Board 0 986-89)

In January, 1997, it was discovered that Brother Anthony had several brain tumors and surgery confirmed that they were malignant. The advanced stage of the tumors determined that aggressive treatment would serve no purpose and so, when he had recovered sufficiently from surgery, he was transferred to St. John's Hospice, Denver, Colorado, where he began his preparations to meet the Lord whom he had served as a religious for nearly forty years. His condition gradually declined and on the evening of March 22, 1997, he died peacefully. The funeral liturgy nos celebrated at St. Dominic Church, Denver, on March 26, 1997, and burial was in the Dominican Plot in Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Denver, Colorado.


Duane Anthony Brown, O.P.

Duane Anthony Brown, the second of four children of George Arthur Brown and Betty Jean Duhon, was born in Lafayette, Louisiana, on July 31, 1968. His grammar school education was at Immaculate Heart of Mary School in Lafayette and he attended Holy Rosary Institute there for his secondary education. Upon graduation from high school he enrolled at Xavier University of Louisiana in New Orleans where he obtained a B.A. in Social Science Education in 1991. For a time he contemplated joining the Missionaries of the Divine Word.

While discerning his vocation he worked as a social science teacher at Holy Rosary Institute, Lafayette, as well as serving as assistant choir director of the adult choir and choir director of the children's choir at his home parish of the Immaculate Heart of Mary in Lafayette. In August of 1992 he entered the novitiate and professed his vows on August 14, 1993, at St. Dominic Priory, Denver, Colorado. He then began his initial studies at Aquinas Institute of Theology, St. Louis, Missouri.

From 1986 Duane was a member of the National Black Catholic Seminarians Association and served the organization as a board member, treasurer, vice-president and president (1995-96). On July 30, 1996, the Association awarded him the Fr. Clarence Williams Award for Outstanding and Devoted Service. In 1994 he helped found the Black Dominicans Conference and served as its first president. Duane was a gifted musician and in 1996 with two other Dominican brothers, Martin Gleeson and John Pitzer, he formed a musical-preaching group named Veritas and in 1997 completed a CD entitled "Tell the Story."

In January of 1997 Duane was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). During the following months he underwent numerous chemotherapy treatments and his time was marked with remissions followed by increasingly severe reoccurrences. The possibility of a bone marrow transplant was considered. Because of the severity of a reoccurrence Duane made his profession of solemn vows in the Chapel of St. Mary's Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri, on July 10, 1997. However, another remission occurred and he was able to return to St. Dominic Priory. In October it was clear that it was only a matter of time before he would succumb to the disease and late on the evening of November 4, 1997, surrounded by his family, Dominican brothers and friends, he died peacefully. A funeral Mass was celebrated at College Church, St. Louis, Missouri, on November 7th, his body was taken to his home parish of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Lafayette, Louisiana, where another Mass was celebrated on November 9th, He was buried in the Dominican Friars plot at Rosaryville, Louisiana, on November 10, 1997.


James Wade Brendan Kelly, O.P.

James Wade Kelly ons born in Chicago, Illinois on March 2, 1934, the second of seven children of John Andrew Kelly and Elizabeth Wade, He attended Ascension grammar school and Fenwick High School, both in Oak Park, Illinois. After graduation from high school he attended the Fournier Institute of Technology, Lemont, Illinois, for one year and then transferred to Loras College, Dubuque, Iowa, for a second year of college.

In August of 1955 he entered the Dominican novitiate at St. Peter Martyr Priory, Winona, Minnesota, where he was given the religious name Brendan. He made his first profession of vows there on August 31, 1956, and then moved to St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois, where he pursued philosophical studies for three years, obtaining a M.A. degree in philosophy in 1959. Having made his solemn profession on August 31, 1959, he was transferred to St. Rose of Lima Priory, Dubuque, Iowa, where he did his theological studies. He was ordained a priest there on June 2, 1962.

Upon the completion of his theological studies he was assigned to the Vicariate of Nigeria where he labored for fifteen years (1963-1978). After a year of special studies in Gusau, he served in several mission stations -Holy Family Cathedral, Sokoto (1964-66), St. Vincent Ferrer Church, Malumfashi (1966-67) and St. Martin de Porres Church, Katsina (1968-72) During this time he took a year`s sabbatical a the School of Oriental and African Studies of the University of London, obtaining a Master's degree. In 1972 he was transferred to the Dominican Institute in Ibadan and named Master of Students, where he was in charge of the formation of newly professed African students. In 1975 he nos named Master of Novices and fulfilled this formation ministry until 1978 at which time he asked to return to the United States.

In April of 1979, soon after his return to the United States, he was elected prior of St. Pius V Priory, Chicago, Illinois. Later that year he chose to affiliate with the newly formed Province of St. Martin de Porres, however, he was never able to serve in this province for he was elected to a second term as prior and then decided to re-affiliate with the Province of St. Albert the Great. During his time at St. Pius V Priory he served as business manager of the Shrine of St. Jude Thaddeus (1979-81 h He was then assigned to St. Vincent Ferrer Priory, River Forest, Illinois (1985-89) where he served in the parish as an associate pastor and in the community as subprior and procurator. He then spent a year as an associate pastor at Holy Rosary Parish, Minneapolis, Minnesota. In 1990 he returned to St. Vincent Ferrer Priory and served as a chaplain at Alexian Brothers Medical Center, Elk Grove Village, Illinois. He again served the community as its procurator and then as prior from September of 1994 until his death.

In the late fall of 1997 doctors discovered that Jim had cancer of the liver, he underwent surgery and a program of chemotherapy was to follow. Because he appeared to be in reasonably good health, his death on the afternoon of January 13, 1998, came as a surprise to his family and his Dominican brothers. The funeral liturgy was celebrated at St. Vincent Ferrer Church, River Forest, Illinois, on January 16, 1997, and he was buried in the Dominican plot at All Saints Cemetery, Des Plaines, Illinois, on January 17, 1997.


Edward Louis Donald Pikell, O.P.

Edward Louis Pikell, the second of eight sons born to Joseph W. Pikell and Martha V. Shubert, was born in Chicago, Illinois on September 25, 1933. Because of family moves he attended several grammar schools: Chandler School, Goshen, Indiana; Mt. Mercy School, Pewee Valley, KY; and St. Gertrude School, Franklin Park, Illinois, After attending Fenwick High School (1947-51) he spent two years at St. Mary's College, Winona, Minnesota.

In August of 1953 he entered the Dominican Novitiate at St. Peter Martyr Priory, Winona, Minnesota, and was given the religious name Donald. Following profession of vows there on August 31, 1954, he was assigned to St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois, for his philosophical studies. There he obtained a M.A. in Philosophy and made hit solemn profession vows on August 31, 1957. For three years he pursued his theological studies at We College of St. Rose of Lima, Dubuque, Iowa, and was ordained on June 4, 1960, by the Most Rev. Leo Binz, Archbishop of Dubuque. Donald was then sent to the University of St. Thomas Aquinas, Rome, Italy, for advanced studies (1960-62) and obtained the Lectorate in Sacred Theology.

His first assignment in ministry was as an instructor in philosophy at both De Lourdes College, Des Plaines, Illinois, and Aquinas Institute, School of Philosophy, River Forest, Illinois. In 1964 he joined the faculty of St. Xavier College, Chicago, Illinois, where he taught philosophy, theology and natural science and for a &me served as coordinator of the Xavier Computer Center. In 1970 he was assigned to be associate pastor at Holy Ghost Parish, Hammond, Louisiana, where he served until 1972 when he joined the campus ministry staff at Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas. In 1974 he was transferred to Champaign, Illinois, and was a member of the campus ministry staff at the University of Illinois, a ministry which he carried out for nine years. From 1983 through 1995 he ministered as an associate pastor at St. Gertrude Parish, St. Claire Shores, Michigan. After twelve years at St. Gertrude's he embarked on a new apostolic ministry and became a staff member of the Heartland Center for Spirituality, Great Bend, Kansas as well as a part-time chaplain to the Dominican Sisters in Great Bend.

Throughout the latter half of 1997 Don began to have attacks which made it difficult for him to breath. Short hospitalizations were followed by a return to work at We Heartland Center. Shortly after Christmas of 1997 his breathing difficulties grew worse and he moved to the infirmary of the Dominican Sisters. Although his condition was known to be serious, his death came unexpectedly in the early evening of January 31, 1998, the result of acute respiratory distress, A wake service was held at We Dominican Sisters' Motherhouse in Great Bend on February 3rd and a funeral Mass celebrated the next day. On February 5th a second wake service and the Mass of Christian Burial were celebrated at St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest Illinois, and burial was in the Dominican Plot of All Saints Cemetery, Des Plaines, Illinois, on February 6, 1998.


Gerald Thomas Bertrand Morahan, O.P.

Gerald Thomas Morahan, the youngest of the five children of Michael J. Morahan and Emily M. Logan, was born in Denver, Colorado, on September 15, 1926. His early education was at St. Dominic Grammar School and then at St. Joseph High School, both in Denver. He then attended Loras College for a year before entering the Dominican novitiate at River Forest, Illinois in September of 1945, where he received the religious name of Bertrand.

On September 20, 1946, he made his first profession at St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois, and remained there for his philosophical studies (1946-49), obtaining a Bachelor of Philosophy degree from the Pontifical Faculty of Philosophy. On September 20, 1949, he made his solemn profession of vows and began theological studies. In September of 1951 he was among the group of theological students who moved to Dubuque, Iowa, to open the Province's new house of studies for theology. He was ordained a priest on May 22, 1952, at St. Rose of Lima Priory, Dubuque, Iowa, and completed his theological studies in 1953.

Father Morahan spent his entire priestly ministry in parishes of the Province. His first assignment was as an associate pastor in the home missions at St. Margaret Parish, Boyce, Louisiana (1953-56). In 1956 he was assigned as an associate at St. Vincent Ferrer Parish, River Forest, Illinois, and then as an associate at Holy Name Parish, Kansas City, Missouri (1958-70). During his twelve years at Holy Name Parish in addition to his work on the parish staff he was Director of the Shrine of Our Lady of the Rosary of Fatima where he regularly broadcast the recitation of the Rosary over a local radio station. In conjunction with his Shrine work he served the Province first as Director of the Confraternity of the Most Holy Rosary and then as Provincial Director of all Dominican Confraternities. It was also during this period of ministry that he taught for a time on the faculty of Lillis High School and wass a regional promoter of vocations for the Province.

In 1970 he was elected Prior of St. Vincent Ferrer Priory, River Forest, Illinois, a position which he held for six years, and at the same time served as an associate pastor at the parish. Following his service as Prior of the community, he continued on there as an associate pastor and in 1983 was asked to join two other Dominicans to begin ministry at a new parish, St. Gertrude's, in St. Clair Shores, Michigan. He served there as an associate pastor until his death.

As early as 1981 Father Morahan was diagnosed with severe heart disease, yet he continued in parish ministry. In May, 1998, his doctors decided that another heart surgery was warranted; he entered the hospital for the surgery, but did not recover and died on June 4, 1998. A wake and funeral liturgy were celebrated at St. Gertrude Parish, St. Clair Shores, Michigan, his body was then taken to Denver, Colorado, where on June 9, 1998, a funeral liturgy was celebrated at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church followed by burial in the Dominican plot at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Denver, Colorado.


Robert Louis Ceslaus Prazan, O.P.

Robert Louis Prazan, O.P., was born on September 5, 1936, in Chicago, Illinois, the oldest of the two children of Louis J. Prazan and Lillian Mary Rasch. He attended St. Leonard Grammar School, Berwyn, Illinois, and Fenwick High School, Oak Park, Illinois. Before entering the Dominican novitiate at St. Peter Martyr Priory, Winona, Minnesota, in August, 1956, he attended Loras College, Dubuque, Iowa, for two years.

He was given the religious name, Ceslaus, and made first profession at Winona on August 31, 1957. He was then assigned to St. Thomas Aquinas Priory (Dominican House of Studies), River Forest, Illinois, for philosophical studies (1967060) earning a Bachelor in Philosophy degree. After profession of solemn vows on August 31, 1960, he went to Dubuque, Iowa, for theological studies at Aquinas Institute, School of Theology (1960-64). There on April 15, 1963, Bishop George J. Biskup ordained him a priest in the chapel of St. Rose of Lima Priory.

After completion of basic studies Father Prazan was assigned to the foreign missions in Nigeria, West Africa, where he was to spend the next twenty-two years of his priestly ministry. After a brief stay in Gusau, Zamfara State, he was assigned as an assistant pastor at St. Dominic Parish, Yelwa, Northern Nigeria, where he spent the next nine years (1965-74) engaged in pre-evangelization work among the Dukkawa people. In the book The Dukkawa of Northwest Nigeria he tells the story of these people. Then for three years (1974-77) he served as assistant pastor at St. Vincent Ferrer Parish, Malumfashi, Northern Nigeria, among the Maguzawa, an ancient Hausa-speaking people. In 1977 he began the third phase of his missionary work which was to continue until his return to the United States in November, 1986. During this time he was stationed at Our Lady of Fatima Parish, Gusau, Zamfara State, and devoted his efforts to full-time preaching and writing in Hausa. To help eradicate illiteracy he produced a very popular aid for teaching Hausa-speakers to read - Karatu: "Rashin sani ya fi dare duhu". For English-speakers learning the Hausa language he wrote Hausa Hints. Among his other writings were two small booklets on the miracles of Jesus and a booklet on the rosary. In addition to the written word he extended his preaching by producing tapes.

In November, 1986, two years after Nigeria had become an independent Province, Father "Ces" returned to the United States, and spent some months in reorienting himself to his native country. He spent six months in campus ministry at South Dakota State University, Brookings, South Dakota, and then explored preaching team ministry in McAllen, Texas. While providing temporary supply help at Our Lady of Pompeii Parish, Tickfaw, Louisiana, Father Prazan found the second love of his priestly ministry. From March, 1988,until his death he served the people of this parish.

In early summer of 1997 "Ces" was diagnosed as having a malignant inoperable tumor in his chest. Chemotherapy and radiation treatments followed. After a brief remission, the cancer began to spread and, in spite of additional chemotherapy treatments, it continued to ravage his body, but not his spirit. He continued his pastoral work at Our Lady of Pompeii parish as long as he was able. His conditioned worsened and on the afternoon of July 5, 1998, because of severe difficulty in breathing, he was rushed to the hospital in Hammond, Louisiana, Efforts to revive him were futile. His funeral Mass was celebrated at his beloved parish on July 8, 1998, with burial in the Dominican plot at Rosaryville, Louisiana.


Bruno Hyacinth Kowalkowski, O.P.

Bruno Stanley Kowalkowski was the eldest of the five children of Bruno Kowalkowski and Rose Therese Chytla. Born in the Pilsen area of Chicago on August 16, 1929, he attended St. Pius V and Notre Dame grammar schools and Crane Technical High School. At the age of eighteen years the assumed a parental role in the home when his father left home. As his mother worked nights, he worked at a Chicago printing company turning over his paychecks to the family. Because of his athletic skill he was for a time at the Chicago White Sox training camp.

On August 30, 1957, he fulfilled a long-standing desire and entered the Dominican novitiate at St. Peter Martyr Priory, Winona, Minnesota, where he received the religious name of Hyacinth. A year later he professed his first vows there on August 31, 1958, and was assigned to St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois, to pursue his philosophical studies, earning a Bachelor of Arts degree. He made his final profession on August 31, 1961, and was assigned to St. Rose of Lima Priory, Dubuque, Iowa, where he spent the next four years studying theology. Bishop George Biskup, auxiliary of Dubuque, ordained him a priest on April 18, 1964.

In September, 1966, Father Kowalkowski began his first assignment as a priest at St. Margaret Parish, Boyce, Louisiana. A year later he was assigned to the foreign missions in the Vicariate of Nigeria West Africa, which was to be the scene of his priestly ministry for the next fifteen years. For a short time he served as an associate pastor at St Dominic Parish, Yaba, Lagos, but was then assigned to St. Vincent Ferrer Parish, Malumfashi, Northern Nigeria (1966-74). For the next three yews he served as associate pastor of St. Dominic Parish, Yelwa, Northern Nigeria, and in 1978 was named administrator of Holy Family Cathedral, Sokoto, Nigeria, a position which he filled until his return to the United States in early 1981.

After completing a course at the Institute for Clergy Education, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana, and a Clinical Pastoral Education program at Alexian Brothers Medical Center, Elk Grove Village, Illinois, he began what was to be nine years of ministry as a hospital chaplain, first at Alexian Brothers Medical Center (1982), then at Hines VA Hospital, Maywood, Illinois (1983-89), and finally at St. Luke's Hospital and VA Hospital, Fargo, North Dakota (1989-91). In 1991 he took up full-time preaching ministry while residing at Holy Rosary Priory, Minneapolis, Minnesota, and continued until 1994 when he was assigned to St Pius V Priory, Chicago, Illinois. There he served the community as business manager until his death. During this time he also did occasional hospital ministry at Hines VA Hospital, Maywood, Illinois, and at St. Anthony Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

Although diagnosed with prostate cancer, Father Kowalkowski continued to serve the St. Pius community. In the spring of 1998 it was confirmed that the cancer had spread to the bone. The cancer became increasingly aggressive and in June he moved to the Juan Macias Care Center, River Forest, Illinois. His condition continued to worsen throughout the summer and on August 10, 1998, surrounded by his family and his Dominican brothers, he died as the Friars sang the Salve Regina. The Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois, on August 13, 1998, and he was buried in the Dominican plot at All Saints Cemetery, Des Plaines, Illinois.


Robert Ferrer Pieper, O.P.

Robert George Pieper was born on October 23, 1927, in Chicago, Illinois, the youngest of the two sons of Raymond A. Pieper and Helen M. Kohnke. He attended St. Peter Canisius Grammar School and St. Ignatius High School, both in Chicago. Upon graduation from high school he began his college education at St John's University, Collegeville, Minnesota.

On June 24, 1947 he entered the Dominican novitiate at St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois, and was given the religious name Ferrer. There he made his first profession on June 25, 1948, and began [is philosophical studies at the Pontifical Faculty of Philosophy, River Forest Illinois, where he completed his college education and obtained a masters degree in philosophy. After making his final vows on June 25, 1951, he was transferred to St. Rose of Lima Priory, Dubuque, Iowa, where he began his theological studies and where he was ordained a priest on May 27, 1954.

Father Pieper began his first assignment in the fall of 1955 as an associate pastor at St. Dominic's Parish, New Orleans, Louisiana. A year later he joined the faculty of Fenwick High School, Oak Park, Illinois, the first of his four different assignments to this ministry. He taught in the history and theology departments and during this time obtained a masters degree in American history from De Paul University, Chicago. In 1962 he was again assigned to St. Dominic's Parish, New/ Orleans, this time for four years. In 1966 he Pas recalled to Fenwick High School to assume the position of Dean of Students, a ministry which he fulfilled until 1971. At that time he was appointed pastor of St. Helena Parish, Amite, Louisiana, where he served for six years. After completing a term as pastor, he was once again assigned to Fenwick High School and taught in the theology department until 1984. At that time the declining health of his mother required his personal attention and until her death in 1988 he provided daily care for his mother. During this time he assisted in parishes in the western suburbs of Chicago. Upon the death of his mother he returned to Fenwick High School for the fourth time, providing assistance to the Dean of Students and managing the bookstore (1988-1990). During the spring semester of 1991 Father Pieper took a sabbatical at the Vatican II Institute, Menlo Park, California.

In the fall of 1991 after his sabbatical, Father Pieper began what was to be his last ministry, that of chaplain to the Little Sisters of the Poor in Palatine, Illinois, and to the residents of St. Joseph's Home which was run by the Little Sisters. He also taught in the formation program for their young Sisters. In late spring of 1997 it was discovered that he had cancer of the stomach and he underwent surgery followed by a program of chemotherapy. The cancer went into remission, however, in early August of 1998 A was determined that the cancer was once again active. In mid-August he entered the Alexian Brothers Hospital in Elk Grove Village, Illinois, and died there unexpectedly on August 19, 1998.

On August 21st a Mass was celebrated for the Little Sisters and the residents of St Joseph's Home, Palatine, Illinois, and on August 22nd the Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois, with burial being in the Dominican plot at All Saints Cemetery, Des Plaines, Illinois.


David John Staszak, O.P.

John Vincent Staszak was born on December 14, 1925, in Cudahy, Wisconsin, the third youngest of the fourteen children of John Vincent Staszak and Anna Stowkowski. Soon thereafter the family located in Pulaski, Wisconsin, where he amended St. Mary's Parochial School and Pulaski High School. Following his graduation from high school he saw military service in the U.S. Navy (1944-1946), serving on a minesweeper in the Sea of Japan. Upon his return to civilian life he entered college, spending a year at the University of Wisconsin (Green Bay) and then transferring to Marquette University in Milwaukee,

On September 12, 1948, he entered the novitiate of the Dominicans, Province of St. Albert the Great, at St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois. He completed his novitiate year at St. Peter Martyr Priory, Winona, Minnesota, and made his first profession of vows there on September 21 1949. He Pas then sent to the Dominican House of Studies, River Forest, Illinois, where he did his philosophical studies (1949-52). Theological studies followed at the Dominican House of Studies, Dubuque, Iowa, and he was ordained there on May 19, 1955, by Bishop Loras T. Lane, auxiliary of the Archdiocese of Dubuque.

In 1956 Father Staszak was given his first assignment as associate pastor of St. Pius V Parish, Chicago, Illinois, which was to become the scene of his priestly ministry for most of his life. At the time his ability to speak Polish was a great asset to the parish staff. As Spanish-speaking parishioners moved into the area "Father David", as he was known to all in the neighborhood, learned Spanish. His ministry in the Pilsen area of Chicago was interrupted by a six-year term as pastor of Holy Rosary Parish, Minneapolis, Minnesota (1972-78). There his compassion for the poor, especially for Native Americans, became widely recognized. During this time he served as treasurer of the Priests' Senate of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. In 1979 he returned to St. Pius V Parish as associate pastor.

Recognizing the need for a shelter for the homeless, in 1981 he founded the San José Obrero Mission for men and continued as its Director until August of 1997. In 1987 he left the staff of St. Pius V Parish to devote himself full-time to the work of the Mission. He became involved in the Pilsen-Little Village Habitat for Humanity and for a time served as its chairman. Also in 1987 he founded the San José

Obrero Family Mission, a shelter for women and children. His work for the poor and needy in the Pilsen area became known throughout the Chicago area and among his many awards on May 9, 1997, he received the Pride of Pilsen Award from the Pilsen Chamber of Commerce. In the summer of 1997, more than forty years after he began his priestly ministry at St. Pius V Parish, Father David turned the direction of the two Missions over to others and in the spring of 1998 joined a fellow Dominican in Watertown, Wisconsin, where he looked forward to green trees and fishing which he loved. Even there the Spanish-speaking of the area sought him out.

On Sunday August 30, 1998, he complained of chest pains and was taken to the hospital in Watertown. Tests showed he had suffered a heart attack and on the next day, when his condition worsened, he was rushed to the hospital at Waukesha, Wisconsin. Efforts to revive him were futile. On September 4, 1998, the Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at his beloved St. Pius V Church in the heart of the Pilsen area. Following the Mass he was buried in the Dominican plot at All Saints Cemetery, Des Plaines, Illinois.


Justin Hilary Freeman, O.P.

Justin Freeman Shapiro, the eldest of the two children of Isadore Shapiro and Nell F. Freeman, was born in New York City on October 4, 1918. His early grammar school education was in the public schools of New York City, after which he spent two years at the Kohut School, Harrison, New York, and then three years at Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts, graduating in 1936. His parents divorced while he was still young and he later legally adopted his mother's maiden name. Following high school he attended Yale University, New Haven Connecticut (1936-39). In October 1940 he began service to his country in the United States Army and obtained a physical discharge in December 1941.

Following his return to civilian life he began a career as a financial and real estate reporter for the Cincinnati Enquirer. It was during this time that he became acquainted with the Dominicans and was received into the Roman Catholic Church October 3, 1942 at St. Robert Bellarmine Church, Cincinnati, Ohio, taking the baptismal name Justin Ignatius. Feeling a call to religious life and the priesthood he entered the Dominican novitiate at St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois,

in June, 1945, and was given the religious name Hilary. On June 25, 194n he made his first profession there and commenced his philosophical studies at the Pontifical Faculty of Philosophy, River Forest, Illinois. Upon making his solemn profession on June 25, 1949, he was transferred to St. Rose of Lima Priory, Dubuque, Iowa to pursue theological studies. In the course of his studies he obtained the Licentiate and Doctorate in Philosophy from the Pontifical Faculty and the S.T.Lr. from the Dominican Studium in Dubuque. On May 22, 1952, he was ordained a priest at St. Rose of Lima Priory, Dubuque, Iowa.

Father Freeman had only two assignments during his entire priestly ministry. After finishing his theological studies his first assignment was to the faculty of Fenwick High School, Oak Park, Illinois (1953-57) and then to the faculty of the College of St Catherine, St Paul, Minnesota, where he taught philosophy until his retirement in 1989. After his retirement from college teaching he continued to reside at Holy Rosary Priory, Minneapolis, Minnesota, until that priory was closed in September, 1995, at which time he moved to St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois.

During his last years his health began to decline and he was diagnosed with cancer. He continued to reside at the assisted living center at St. Thomas Aquinas Priory until July, 1998, when his deteriorating physical condition made it necessary to transfer him to Resurrection Life Center, Chicago, Illinois, where he died on November 3, 1998. The funeral liturgy was celebrated at St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois, on November 5, 1998, with burial following in the Dominican plot at All Saints Cemetery, Des Plaines, Illinois.


Michael Dominick McGreal, O.P.

Dominick Francis McGreal, the son of Dominick McGreal and Catherine Kelly, was born at Westport, County Mayo, Ireland, on June 10, 1920. In 1930 at We age of ten he immigrated with his family to the United States and settled in North Cambridge, Massachusetts. He attended St. John's Grammar School in North Cambridge and the Boys Vocational School, East Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he was trained in bookbinding and printing.

He began his postulancy as a cooperator brother in the Order in July,

1941, at St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois, and was given the religious name, Michael. In due course he began his novitiate there on January 2, 1944 made his first profession of vows on January 3, 1943, and renewed his temporary profession there on January 3, 1946. During this time he served the community in various tasks, usually working in the kitchen. In 1947 he was assigned to St. Dominic Priory, Oak Park, Illinois, where he made his solemn profession on January 3, 1949.

Throughout his active ministerial life he served various communities of the Province: St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois (1941-47); St. Dominic Priory, Oak Park, Illinois (1947-54); St. Peter Martyr Priory, Winona, Minnesota (1954-56); Holy Rosary Priory, Minneapolis, Minnesota (1956-58); and St. Peter Martyr Priory, Winona, Minnesota, for a second time (1958-69).

When St. Peter Martyr Priory, Winona, Minnesota, was closed in 1969, Michael was assigned to limited service in the Province and resided in several different care facilities, the last ten years of his life being spent at Our Lady of Guadalupe Center, Cherry Valley, California. On the evening of November 21, 1998, Michael complained of indigestion and retired to his room. When he did not appear later, members of the community investigated and found him dead of an apparent heart attack. A memorial Mass was celebrated at the Center on November 24th and a wake and funeral Mass was celebrated at St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois, on November 25, 1998. Burial followed in the Dominican plot at All Saints Cemetery, Des Plaines, Illinois.


Thomas Cajetan Donlan, O.P.

Thomas Joseph Donlan, was born on September 15, 1917, in Chicago, Illinois, the older of the two children of Anne Marie (Sheehan) and Thomas Joseph Donlan. He grew up in Oak Park, Illinois, and attended St Catherine of Siena Grammar School and Fenwick High School. Upon graduation from high school he spent two years at Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island, before deciding to enter the Dominican novitiate of the Province of St. Joseph.

In August of 1937 he began his novitiate at St. Rose of Lima Priory, Springfield, Kentucky, where he received the religious name of Cajetan. He made his first profession there on August 16, 1938, and was assigned to St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois, to begin his philosophical studies. When the new province of St. Albert the Great was formed in December, 1939, he chose to be affiliated with it. Father Donlan made his final profession at St. Thomas Aquinas Priory on August 16, 1941, and was ordained there on June 8, 1944, completed his theological studies in 1945 and was awarded the S. T. Lr. degree.

From 1945 through 1952 he was assigned to Fenwick High School, Oak Park, Illinois, where he served as chair of the Department of Religion. For two years (1946-48) he interrupted his teaching to pursue graduate studies at the Pontifical Faculty, Dominican House of Studies, Washington, D.C., and obtained the doctorate in theology in 1952. For one year he taught theology at Marycrest College, Davenport, Iowa, and then joined the Dominican faculty at St. Rose of Lima Priory, Dubuque, Iowa, where he was professor of moral theology (1953-57) and professor of homiletics (1954-60). During 1963-64 Father Donlan was a Fulbright Research Scholar in Theology at the Institute Catholique de Paris, an experience which established lasting ties with France and the French Dominicans. He was one of the founders of The Priory Press serving as vice-president (1953-60) and then as president (1960-65). When The Priory Press moved to Chicago in 1964, Father Donlan moved with it, and helped to establish St. Louis Bertrand House which served as a publications house for the Province.

In 1969 Father Donlan began a nearly fifteen-year period in which he served the Church nationally and internationally in various capacities. He assisted the United States Catholic Conference as Director of Research and Development in Religious Education (1969-72) in Washington, D.C.; was editor of the Catholic Digest (1972-75) in Minneapolis, Minnesota; served as Rome Correspondent for the National Catholic News Service (1975-77) in Rome, Italy and returned to the United States to serve as Officer for Public Education, Catholic Relief Services (1977-83) in New York City. From 1983 until early 1997 he resided first at St. Stephen Parish (1977-89) and the at St. Agnes Parish (1989-97) in New York. During this time he was the Sole U.S. Agent for the French Dominican publishing house, Les Editions du Cerf; assisted Father Patrick Peyton, C.S.C., with the Family Rosary Crusade (198-1984), and served as chaplain to the Catholic Actor's Guild of America (1985-94. At the age of 80 he began limited service and took up residence at St. Vincent Ferrer Priory, River Forest, Illinois.

In addition to these ministries Father Donlan served the Province of St. Albert the Great as Provincial Director of Education (1964-66) and as a member of the Provincial Council (1969-73). For two years (196769) he was chair of special commission appointed by the Master of the Order for the Publication of Books in the Order of Preachers. He was a member of the College Theology Society which he served as vice president (1955-56), president (1956-68) and director (1958-60). In 1986 he was elected to the Fenwick High School Hall of Fame.

Father Donlan was stopping in Paris after having spent some time with his nephew in Rome when he was unexpectedly taken sick early on the morning of February 26, 1999. Having suffered an apparent heart attack, he soon slipped into a coma and died later that morning at the American Hospital of Neuilly-sur-Seine, near Paris, without regaining consciousness. A memorial funeral liturgy was celebrated on March 3rd at St. Vincent Ferrer Church, River Forest, Illinois, and on March 20, 1999, his remains were interred with a private ceremony in the Dominican plot at All Saints Cemetery, Des Plaines, Illinois.


Victor Samuel LaMotte,O.P.

Samuel Joseph LaMotte, the son of Samuel LaMotte and Dolores Andres, was born in Providence, Rhode Island, on July 12, 1927. He was orphaned as a very young child and grew up in several different foster homes in Providence. His early education was at St. Raymond Grammar School and LaSalle Academy, although for financial reasons he found it necessary to interrupt his high school education and become a mill worker for a time. He completed his high school education at the Seminary of Our Lady of Holy Cross, North Easton, Massachusetts, and upon graduation joined the United States Army, serving with the occupation forces in Japan (1946-1947).

After his discharge from the Army in December, 1947, he took advantage of the G.I. Bill and attended Providence College for a year. Believing he had a call to the priesthood he applied to the Province of St. Albert the Great and was sent to St. Mary's College, Winona, Minnesota, to prepare for entrance into the novitiate. in August, 1950, he entered the novitiate at St Peter Martyr Priory, Winona, was given the religious name Victor, and made his first profession there on September 5, 1951. For three years he pursued philosophical studies at the Pontifical Faculty of Philosophy (Dominican House of Studies), River Forest, IL, making his solemn profession there on September 5, 1954. Victor began his theological studies at the College of St. Rose of Lima, Dubuque, Iowa (1954-55), and completed them at the College of St. Albert the Great, Oakland, California (1955-58). On June 16, 1956, Archbishop Guilfoyle ordained him a priest at St. Mary's Cathedral, San Francisco.

Father LaMotte's life ministry was teaching. He was first assigned to St. Albert the Great Rectory, Minneapolis, Minnesota (1958-61), where he taught medical ethics at St. Mary's Hospital and conducted classes for the novices of the Sisters of St. Joseph. For a year he was chaplain and professor of philosophy and theology for the Dominican Sisters at Rosaryville, Louisiana (1961-62). In 1962 he moved to St. Dominic Priory, Oak Park, Illinois, and taught at DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois (1962-64). He began doctoral studies in 1964 at the Pontifical Faculty, River Forest, Illinois, during which time he also served as chaplain to Trinity Convent. During 1967-68 he continued his studies at Wycliffe Hall, Oxford University, England, and at the Goethe Institute, Am Spitalbach, West Germany. In 1968 he was awarded the degree Doctor of Philosophy.

He returned to the United States to teach at Aquinas Institute, School of Philosophy River Forest Illinois (1968-70), and then moved on to Loyola University of Chicago (1969-74) Father LaMotte returned to his college alma mater, St. Mary's in Winona, Minnesota, as Professor of Religious Studies and campus minister in 1974. In 1977 he was appointed Professor of Religious Studies at Lewis University, Lockport, Illinois, where he remained for eighteen years until his retirement in 1995. There he was known as an excellent teacher and a compassionate campus minister. Always ready to be of service to his brothers, Father LaMotte took a leave of absence from Lewis University (1981 -84) to teach philosophy to the Dominican student brothers at Aquinas Institute, St. Louis, Missouri.

In addition to his teaching Father LaMotte was equally known for his over thirty years of labor as editor, contributor and finally publisher of Listening: Journal of Religion and Culture. Under his leadership it became a highly respected journal in the academic community. His wide interests led him to be corresponding secretary for the Albertus Magnus Lyceum (1964-67), an associate of the Center for Studies in Religious Education (1969-71) Director of TRS Consultants (1978-92), and Director of the Institute of Spirituality (1978-88).

Always plagued by ill health, in 1995 Father LaMotte retired from teaching and was assigned to limited service, although he remained active in promoting and seeking support for Listening. He was diagnosed with prostate cancer which in spite of treatment spread to the bone and other parts of his body. He died at Loyola Hospital, Melrose Park, Illinois, on May 19, 1999. His funeral Mass was celebrated at St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, River Forest, Illinois, on May 22, 1999, and he was buried in the Dominican plot at All Saints, Cemetery, Des Plaines, Illinois.